A USER'S GUIDE TO POWER

Leadership, Learning & Change

Exams, Reality Shows and Other Rites of Passage

There's been an explosion of reality TV contests -  the Next Big Whatever Star. While the chance to become a celebrity lures contestants, I think it's the grueling rite of passage that lures viewers. Last month we had exams at the Process Work Institute, which were...

read more

Growing Pains: Democracy and the Paradox of Power

Not an easy time we're in. It's one of the most polarized and angry political climates I've seen. I must confess to being pretty disheartened by the violent tone of political discourse. David Brooks wrote about it last week, putting the problem in historical...

read more

Notes on scandal: leadership and public learning

Last week news broke that 15 year-old Phoebe Prince killed herself after months of harassment and bullying by her classmates at a South Hadley, MA high school. School administrators initially denied knowing anything about it, even though Prince's mother had complained...

read more

Immigration = Innovation

Just when we thought we couldn't take another heated public debate, immigration reform is up next in Congress. I can only imagine the nightmare scenarios, scare tactics, fear mongering and isolationism that's going to be bandied about. So here's a little something to...

read more

Giving Due Process

In a move which I find hard not to characterize as deliberately antagonistic, Portland City Commissioner Randy Leonard and City Auditor LaVonne Griffin-Valade are pushing for a vote this week on a resolution to strengthen the citizen police oversight board while...

read more

The Reading Roundup

I read a lot, not as much as I'd like, which I would like to blame on the super-addictive UFC, Guy Frieri, not to mention the time-consuming tasks of Facebook, Twitter, and well, OK, I admit, the occasional spider solitaire game (sigh). Though in spite of such vices,...

read more

The non-doing of leadership

This past week I was in Yachats attending the Mindell's seminar, and pondering the question they were posing, what moves you? Writing about motivation, leadership and learning, we can begin to forget this question and think that I move myself. I decide. I lead. I...

read more

The high cost of peak performance

Last week the American Psychiatric Associations released a draft of DSM-V, the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders. The final version is set to come out in May 2013. It has a number of proposed revisions which have been widely blogged about,...

read more

Learning as its Own Reward

I asked my trainer and owner of Recreate Fitness, Nathan, if he would coach a "cross-fit club" with my 5th grade boys from the I Have a Dream foundation. It's one of my kids and leadership clubs I've been doing. It's definitely been fun, but also challenging. Some of...

read more

Five Leadership Trends for the Next Decade

The last decade is a strong contender for the title "the decade of dubious leadership." From the handling of Katrina to the collapse of the banking system, it was a disastrous decade for leadership. Ironically, it was also a decade during which more was written on...

read more

Single, available hero seeking big messy problem

What's the solution for solving the health care mess? Global warming? The economy? OK, these are bad examples, obviously if we knew, and if it were that easy, they'd be solved. But the question I want to ask is, why do we wait to tackle our problems until they are so...

read more

Workplace Bullying and Cultural Tolerance

Just finished a weekend training seminar on bullying in Auckland, New Zealand. It was terrific to have so many participants there involved in workplace bullying and harassment work. What's increasingly evident as I tackle this topic around the globe is the role of...

read more

Process Work on Change

In Brisbane this week and I just finished teaching a seminar on the Unfinished Work of Ancestors, exploring how our relative ease and/or discomfort in the world is influenced by generational issues and attitudes, known and unknown, seen and unseen. The wars, famines,...

read more

Why I Love Jerry Maguire

I'm getting clearer on what this blog is about. I have started to call it, to myself at least, Learning and Leading. While leadership and power is a main focus, looking over the posts, I see that a great deal of what I write about involves the problems of learning to...

read more

Internet bullying and managing conflict

Randy Cohen, the New York Times' ethicist, recently opined on the court ruling that ordered Google to release the name of the anonymous blogger whose site Skanks in NYC was devoted to slandering a fashion model: Has anonymous posting, though generally protected by...

read more